Leap of Faith

Leap of Faith

“To live, to TRULY live, we must be willing to RISK. To be nothing in order to find everything. To leap before we look.”― Mandy Hale, author I saw a social media post today that spoke volumes. On the left was, “where I am.” On the right was, “where I want to be.” In between was a huge cavern. The only way to get across was to jump. Take a leap of faith. Our lives are full of moments – seasons even – where in order for us to get to where we want to be, we must take that leap of faith. From the time we are toddlers learning to walk to teenagers going to a college thousands of miles from home to mid-lifers quitting our job to travel the world. Where would we be if we didn’t take that leap of faith? We’d be in that dead end job we despise. We’d be in that vanilla, unfulfilling relationship. Often times our leap requires us to physically move. I took a leap of faith and moved to Nashville from Arizona. I didn’t have a job and I only knew one person. My life completely transformed. I rented apartments and eventually bought and sold several houses. My latest leap involved a new relationship in a new state and a new home. Taking the leap of home ownership can be scary but just like so many other things in our lives, once we do it, we wonder why we waited so long. Owning your own space is truly rewarding. It is a respite. You put your own personal touches in it and smile every time you walk through the door. You also have an investment you can hopefully benefit from if your next leap of faith takes you to a new place in the world. So take that leap whether it be big or small. There is an entire world out there. Don’t get stuck in regret or complacency. Make a way of your own and don’t be worried what others will think. You have one life – YOU – it’s yours. Live it the best you can. Enjoy it. And in the words of David Lee Roth, “go ahead and...

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Does it Really Take a Village?

Does it Really Take a Village?

You’ve heard the phrase, “it takes a village.” It’s used in various contexts. People use it to describe everything from the challenge of raising children, to winning a championship, to just getting through life itself. I was thinking about it in the context of real estate and wondered, “does it really take a village?” Let’s explore. I think of a “village” as a team. In anything big, important, or impactful, it takes a team to accomplish it. There are very few “lone rangers” in the world that have done something big without help from someone else. I believe real estate is no different. Whether you are buying or selling, you need a team of professionals to do what they do best to help you get to the finish line – closing table – successfully. If you are Selling: Appraiser – If your house is unique, the best way to find value may be getting a professional appraisal. It doesn’t mean that’s what someone will be willing to pay for the house, it just gives you a place to start when it is tough to calculate value using traditional real estate methods of comparisons.Home stager – The house needs to look like a model home in order to appeal to the most buyers. Just because you don’t mind toys in every corner and the huge sofa that you have to jump over to get to the kitchen doesn’t mean it’s the best way to showcase your property when selling.Photographer – Approximately 99% of all home buyers start their buying process online. You won’t even get them in the door if the photos don’t highlight the best of what your property has to offer.Landscaper – Don’t underestimate curb appeal. If the landscaping is done tastefully, you can put a Buyer in a buying mindset even before they open the front door.Realtor – I don’t need to tell you, again, why you need to hire a professional. We sell hundreds, even thousands of homes, you don’t. The end.Handyman – There will be little things that need to be fixed in order to get your house ready to sell. Instead of stress out and take longer than needed, hire a handyman to knock things off the list quickly.Electrician – You may not realize you have an electrical issue until a Buyer has a home inspection. Have someone on hand, just in case (your Realtor can usually help you with trade vendors)Plumber – Small leaks, drips, water heater issues, toilet seals, etc. are all things I see come up that need to be repaired prior to a sale.Roofer – Most reputable roofing companies will give you a free inspection as well as do small...

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How to Price Your Home

How to Price Your Home

Sellers want the most money they can get for their house. They often already have a price in mind when I meet with them to talk about their home sale. Most people have their finger on the pulse of their neighborhood and know what other homes have sold for nearby. The issue is, most of the time, Sellers think their house is better than all the other houses that have ever sold in their area. (insert pause for chuckle because you know it’s true) So, when you want to sell, you really need a professional opinion to know how to price your home. Things to consider: Age.With development going on everywhere you turn around, you may be competing with brand new homes or homes that are being built. Builders have much deeper pockets than individuals and can offer incentives to Buyers. If you compete with new construction, you must have some fantastic upgrades that others would want, be in pristine condition and/or price it less than what the new ones are asking.Location.The exact same house can vary in price just by where it’s located. Is it on a main street? Is it on a corner? Is it near amenities? Is it closer to transit? Is it near ongoing construction? Does it back up to something less desirable than others? Is it in the back of the neighborhood versus the front with limited access to ingress and egress? These are considerations and can help determine price. Just thinking that your lot is better isn’t enough. You must know why and be able to justify it.Upgrades and finishes.This is a tricky one. What you consider an upgrade may not be to a Buyer. Also, when was it upgraded? What materials did you use compared to what other similar homes have? Just because you spent $25,000 to have the backsplash tile shipped in from Italy does not mean that a Buyer will feel the same about it and be willing to pay for it. If you have personalized your home too much, you need to understand that you may only get to capitalize on the enjoyment it has given you while you lived there and not expect a Buyer to eat the cost when purchasing.Condition.This seems like a given, but, again, people’s ideas of good condition can vary widely. We live with our home’s flaws. We tend to get so accustomed to them that we don’t even see them anymore. A Buyer comes in and sees everything you have overlooked for years.Floor plan.Is the master bedroom upstairs in an area that is mostly empty nesters? Do you have a galley kitchen that’s tucked away when the trend is “open to the living...

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Do You Read?

Do You Read?

Every week I pore over my keyboard, trying to decide what I should write about. What do people want to hear? If you’re a Seller, what’s important for you to know? If you’re a Buyer, what questions do you have? So this week I wondered, “Does anyone really even read these?” Do you read it? If so, comment below and let me know. If you have questions or are interested in a particular topic, let me know. Give me some feedback. Sometimes social media isn’t very social and technology can be cold so interact a bit and I’ll keep ‘em...

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